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Storage Technology

Utility computing is compelling

Storage major EMC believes forging partnerships and leveraging on combined strengths to address the sticky issues with Storage, and penetrate segments such as SME. With plenty of alliances on the anvil, Tony Leung, Managing Director-Marketing, Asia Pacific/Japan, EMC Corporation updates Venkatesh Ganesh on EMCs new strategies and products

SMEs shy away from the complexities of implementing networked storage. How have you tackled this issue while pursuing the SME segment?

We have announced our partnership with Dell in distributing the CLARiion AX 100 array. We understand that modern day storage solutions can sometimes get complex. The CLARiion AX 100 precisely aims to reduce the complexity of implementing network storage. The Dell/EMC AX 100 array is available in a direct-attached SAN-ready configuration. We also have a complete scalable SAN configuration too.

Our understanding in this space has been that the availability and performance benefits of networked storage are of utmost importance to the SMEs. The complexity and high cost previously associated with the technology, which deters small companies, is addressed by the CLARiion AX 100. We took into account these issues and decided to offer a cost-effective, and easy-to-use solution. This can enable customers to move from internal server-based disks to external direct-attached storage (for both SAN and NAS environments).

What features in the new product are most suited for the SMEs?

Firstly, the product (CLARiion AX 100) is based on an EMC patent-pending design and technology. It is a customer-installable networked storage system that is capable of storing up to 3 terabytes of information. Besides, there are built-in functions that are easier to manage and offer good protection. It incorporates the RAID technologies from the CLARiion CX family and delivers cost-effective ATA storage in a 3.5-inch rack-mountable enclosure with integrated storage management. The storage management functions range from monitoring local space-saving snapshot replication (for instant backup and recovery) to a user-friendly interface. The CLARiion AX 100 offers a web-based interface for secure and remote management of the system from any Internet connection.

SANs seem to be getting more complex. How is EMC addressing the issue?

Yes, we do agree that SANs are getting more complex. To address this need, we are developing a storage router software that will use virtualization technology. Basically, it will let customers migrate data among the disk arrays in a storage area network without shutting down or affecting the applications using the data. In the initial stages, we are planning to tailor the storage router for customers in large enterprises who deal with bigger and complex SANs. As this growth occurs, the tolerance for planned and unexpected downtime of storage arrays shrinks.

We have partnered with switch vendor Brocade Communications Systems and are looking at partnering with Cisco too (at the time of going to press sources within EMC are on the verge of announcing a tie-up with Cisco). With this partnership, we plan to develop a technology that builds intelligent storage routing capability into the networking companies' switch fabrics. The result will allow dynamic routing of data. EMC will work with standards organizations to figure out the best way to provide APIs, so that a storage router can work with intelligent switch fabrics. Besides, this virtualization will extend across all vendors.

Where does the concept of utility computing stand today?

We feel that the concept of 'utility computing' is compelling to say the least. From the CIO perspective, they are trying to do a couple of things. Firstly, they are trying to figure out whether it is hype or reality. Secondly, does it apply for my business? We feel that unlike the past 'big things' in technology, this wave of innovation would not require corporations to rip out existing technology and replace it with newer and costlier software and hardware.

Instead, they can gradually add technologies or services that make their computing systems more automated. It is about a rip-and-replace approach, but one that can incrementally move down the path of utility computing.

As a result, much of the cost and complexity can be wrung out. The idea is that the power plant-like computing systems of the future will operate both at remote data centers and within a company's offices. The idea of making information technology as easy as plugging into an electrical socket would be the key differentiating factor of this trend. Besides, the practical implications of aligning business requirements with IT and driving operational costs down would make this trend happen.

We feel that more than the hype surrounding utility computing, the key to explore this trend would lie in its interpretation for everybody.

If you take an example of storage management, there are so many messages that emanate from different vendors that it gets the CIO confused in trying to figure out the right solution for their businesses. Even the CIOs understand that sometimes the vendors' strategies are articulated only to apply to their environments.

Customers can look at storage companies to be their de facto storage management layer and weave it around the utility computing layer. This would simplify the existing complexity to a large extent.

What products are you launching in India?

For the Indian market, we recently announced a slew of products totaling more than twelve. Along with this, we have innovations on the software front, which extends across the entire range of EMC tiered storage platforms. These new software offerings are intended to enhance the backup, protection and recovery of information.

These products are targeted at the high-end and mid-tier SAN, NAS and CAS (Content Addressed Storage) segments. For SAN, we have CLARiion CX series and Symmetrix DMX-2 systems. In the NAS space, we have introduced the Celerra NAS gateways and integrated systems and to address the requirements in the content addressed storage segment, we have Centera, a system that unlocks the value of fixed-content digital assets stored in mainframe environments.

In addition to this, EMC last year announced a five year multi-million dollar investment and are backing it up with the industry's comprehensive and technically advanced storage software, platforms and services. We can meet the needs of the mid-tier storage market, which is one of the fastest growing segments in India.

Identifying this need, we have established partnerships with Dell and Datacraft (who are our global patners too) and an Indian network of system integrators like Wipro, Tata Elxsi and HCL.

The writer can be reached at

venkatesh@expresscomputeronline.com

 
 
     
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Copyright 2001: Indian Express Newspapers (Bombay) Limited (Mumbai, India). All rights reserved throughout the world.
This entire site is compiled in Mumbai by the Business Publications Division (BPD) of the Indian Express Newspapers (Bombay) Limited. Site managed by BPD.
Utility computing is compelling - In Person - Network Magazine India
 Archives ||About Us || Advertise || Feedback || Subscribe-
-
Issue of July 2004 
-

  -  
 
 Home > In Person
 Print Friendly Page ||  Email this story

Storage Technology

Utility computing is compelling

Storage major EMC believes forging partnerships and leveraging on combined strengths to address the sticky issues with Storage, and penetrate segments such as SME. With plenty of alliances on the anvil, Tony Leung, Managing Director-Marketing, Asia Pacific/Japan, EMC Corporation updates Venkatesh Ganesh on EMCs new strategies and products

SMEs shy away from the complexities of implementing networked storage. How have you tackled this issue while pursuing the SME segment?

We have announced our partnership with Dell in distributing the CLARiion AX 100 array. We understand that modern day storage solutions can sometimes get complex. The CLARiion AX 100 precisely aims to reduce the complexity of implementing network storage. The Dell/EMC AX 100 array is available in a direct-attached SAN-ready configuration. We also have a complete scalable SAN configuration too.

Our understanding in this space has been that the availability and performance benefits of networked storage are of utmost importance to the SMEs. The complexity and high cost previously associated with the technology, which deters small companies, is addressed by the CLARiion AX 100. We took into account these issues and decided to offer a cost-effective, and easy-to-use solution. This can enable customers to move from internal server-based disks to external direct-attached storage (for both SAN and NAS environments).

What features in the new product are most suited for the SMEs?

Firstly, the product (CLARiion AX 100) is based on an EMC patent-pending design and technology. It is a customer-installable networked storage system that is capable of storing up to 3 terabytes of information. Besides, there are built-in functions that are easier to manage and offer good protection. It incorporates the RAID technologies from the CLARiion CX family and delivers cost-effective ATA storage in a 3.5-inch rack-mountable enclosure with integrated storage management. The storage management functions range from monitoring local space-saving snapshot replication (for instant backup and recovery) to a user-friendly interface. The CLARiion AX 100 offers a web-based interface for secure and remote management of the system from any Internet connection.

SANs seem to be getting more complex. How is EMC addressing the issue?

Yes, we do agree that SANs are getting more complex. To address this need, we are developing a storage router software that will use virtualization technology. Basically, it will let customers migrate data among the disk arrays in a storage area network without shutting down or affecting the applications using the data. In the initial stages, we are planning to tailor the storage router for customers in large enterprises who deal with bigger and complex SANs. As this growth occurs, the tolerance for planned and unexpected downtime of storage arrays shrinks.

We have partnered with switch vendor Brocade Communications Systems and are looking at partnering with Cisco too (at the time of going to press sources within EMC are on the verge of announcing a tie-up with Cisco). With this partnership, we plan to develop a technology that builds intelligent storage routing capability into the networking companies' switch fabrics. The result will allow dynamic routing of data. EMC will work with standards organizations to figure out the best way to provide APIs, so that a storage router can work with intelligent switch fabrics. Besides, this virtualization will extend across all vendors.

Where does the concept of utility computing stand today?

We feel that the concept of 'utility computing' is compelling to say the least. From the CIO perspective, they are trying to do a couple of things. Firstly, they are trying to figure out whether it is hype or reality. Secondly, does it apply for my business? We feel that unlike the past 'big things' in technology, this wave of innovation would not require corporations to rip out existing technology and replace it with newer and costlier software and hardware.

Instead, they can gradually add technologies or services that make their computing systems more automated. It is about a rip-and-replace approach, but one that can incrementally move down the path of utility computing.

As a result, much of the cost and complexity can be wrung out. The idea is that the power plant-like computing systems of the future will operate both at remote data centers and within a company's offices. The idea of making information technology as easy as plugging into an electrical socket would be the key differentiating factor of this trend. Besides, the practical implications of aligning business requirements with IT and driving operational costs down would make this trend happen.

We feel that more than the hype surrounding utility computing, the key to explore this trend would lie in its interpretation for everybody.

If you take an example of storage management, there are so many messages that emanate from different vendors that it gets the CIO confused in trying to figure out the right solution for their businesses. Even the CIOs understand that sometimes the vendors' strategies are articulated only to apply to their environments.

Customers can look at storage companies to be their de facto storage management layer and weave it around the utility computing layer. This would simplify the existing complexity to a large extent.

What products are you launching in India?

For the Indian market, we recently announced a slew of products totaling more than twelve. Along with this, we have innovations on the software front, which extends across the entire range of EMC tiered storage platforms. These new software offerings are intended to enhance the backup, protection and recovery of information.

These products are targeted at the high-end and mid-tier SAN, NAS and CAS (Content Addressed Storage) segments. For SAN, we have CLARiion CX series and Symmetrix DMX-2 systems. In the NAS space, we have introduced the Celerra NAS gateways and integrated systems and to address the requirements in the content addressed storage segment, we have Centera, a system that unlocks the value of fixed-content digital assets stored in mainframe environments.

In addition to this, EMC last year announced a five year multi-million dollar investment and are backing it up with the industry's comprehensive and technically advanced storage software, platforms and services. We can meet the needs of the mid-tier storage market, which is one of the fastest growing segments in India.

Identifying this need, we have established partnerships with Dell and Datacraft (who are our global patners too) and an Indian network of system integrators like Wipro, Tata Elxsi and HCL.

The writer can be reached at

venkatesh@expresscomputeronline.com

 
     
- <Back to Top>-  

Copyright 2001: Indian Express Newspapers (Bombay) Limited (Mumbai, India). All rights reserved throughout the world.
This entire site is compiled in Mumbai by the Business Publications Division (BPD) of the Indian Express Newspapers (Bombay) Limited. Site managed by BPD.